Response-factor approach


The response-factor approach is based on a method in which the response factors represent the transfer functions of the wall due to unit impulse excitations. The real excitation is approximated by a superposition of such impulses (mostly of triangular shape), and the real response is determined by the superposition of the impulse responses (see Figs. 11.33 and 11.34).  [c.1067]

One approach to finding the optimum response is to use a searching algorithm. In a one-factor-at-a-time optimization, one factor is varied while holding constant all other factors, until there is no further improvement in the response. The process then continues with the next factor until no further improvement is found when changing any of the factors. This approach to finding the optimum response is often effective, but not efficient. Another searching algorithm, that is both effective and efficient, is a simplex optimization, the rules of which allow us to change the values of all factors simultaneously.  [c.699]

Noise. Performance of a system, whether it be an analytical spectrometer or thermal imager, improves as the detector noise is lowered until amplifier noise becomes the dominant noise source, provided that the responsivity is not reduced faster than the detector noise. A weU-engiaeered approach to improvement of system sensitivity consists of (/) lowering amplifier noise consistent with system bandwidth, power, weight, size, and cost budgets (2) perfecting the detector material and fabrication processes for least defects to achieve lowest noise and (3) designing the detector mode of operation, geometry, response time, and bias power for highest responsivity. The operating parameters of the detector are often adjusted to iacrease responsivity and noise to the poiat where the detector noise just exceeds the amplifier noise if ia fact that is possible.  [c.421]

One approach to combating antibiotic resistance caused by P-lactamase is to inhibit the enzyme (see Enzyme inhibition). Effective combinations of enzyme inhibitors with P-lactam antibiotics such as penicillins or cephalosporins, result in a synergistic response, lowering the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) by a factor of four or more for each component. However, inhibition of P-lactamases alone is not sufficient. Pharmacokinetics, stability, ability to penetrate bacteria, cost, and other factors are also important in determining whether an inhibitor is suitable for therapeutic use. Almost any class of P-lactam is capable of producing P-lactamase inhibitors. Several reviews have been pubUshed on P-lactamase inhibitors, detection, and properties (8—15).  [c.45]

One approach to finding the optimum response is to use a searching algorithm. In a one-factor-at-a-time optimization, one factor is varied while holding constant all other factors, until there is no further improvement in the response. The process then continues with the next factor until no further improvement is found when changing any of the factors. This approach to finding the optimum response is often effective, but not efficient. Another searching algorithm, that is both effective and efficient, is a simplex optimization, the rules of which allow us to change the values of all factors simultaneously.  [c.699]

The latter two free energies of chemical transformation are computed in the course of FES. The advantage of this approach is that it avoids calculations of ligand-receptor binding free energy per se, i.e., AG° and AG°, which would be extremely computationally intensive, without sacrificing the theoretical rigor of calculation of binding constants from molecular simulations of ligand-receptor interaction. Faster free energy simulation approaches based on the linear response theory have been introduced to improve the computational efficiency of free energy simulations [54-56]. Despite its computational intensity, theFES-TC approach finds important and growing applications in the analysis of ligand-receptor interactions and drug design [57-60].  [c.363]

Uranium alloys are very susceptible to stress corrosion cracking and a knowledge of the surface stresses involved are essential. In an uncoated U-Ti alloy these have been found to be relatively large and compressive at 365 MPa but the presence of nickel or zinc coatings on the rod surface led to much smaller compressive stress . The stress corrosion behaviour of U-7yNb-2yZr in oxygen and hydrogen gases over a temperature range of -20 to 100°C under pressures varying from 0-3 x 10" to 0-15 MPa have been analysed using a fracture mechanics approach"". Stress corrosion cracking mapping and cracking kinetics were determined as functions of stress intensity factor, temperature and pressure. It was found that the mechanism responsible for SCC varied with the experimental conditions used.  [c.912]

In modern practice, inhibitors are rarely used in the form of single compounds — particularly in near-neutral solutions. It is much more usual for formulations made up from two, three or more inhibitors to be employed. Three factors are responsible for this approach. Firstly, because individual inhibitors are effective with only a limited number of metals the protection of multi-metal systems requires the presence of more than one inhibitor. (Toxicity and pollution considerations frequently prevent the use of chromates as universal inhibitors.) Secondly, because of the separate advantages possessed by inhibitors of the anodic and cathodic types it is sometimes of benefit to use a formulation composed of examples from each type. This procedure often results in improved protection above that given by either type alone and makes it possible to use lower inhibitor concentrations. The third factor relates to the use of halide ions to improve the action of organic inhibitors in acid solutions. The halides are not, strictly speaking, acting as inhibitors in this sense, and their function is to assist in the adsorption of the inhibitor on to the metal surface. The second and third of these methods are often referred to as synergised treatments.  [c.780]


See pages that mention the term Response-factor approach : [c.2277]    [c.41]    [c.152]    [c.601]    [c.699]    [c.699]    [c.96]    [c.918]   
Industrial ventilation design guidebook (2001) -- [ c.1067 ]