Gelcoat


To a large extent the reservoir geology controls the producibility of a formation, i.e. to what degree transmissibility to fluid flow and pressure communication exists. Knowledge of the reservoir geological processes has to be based on extrapolation of the very limited data available to the geologist, yet the geological model s the base on which the field development plan will be built.  [c.76]

Introduction and commercial application Data gathering is an activity which provides the geologist and engineer with the information required to estimate the volume of the reservoir, its fluid content, productivity, and potential for development. Data gathering is not only carried out at the appraisal and development planning stage of the field life cycle, but continues throughout the field life. This section will focus on the data gathered for field development planning data gathering for managing the field during the production period is discussed in Section 14.0.  [c.125]

Frank Jahn has worked as a Petroleum Geologist mainly in Brunei, Thailand, the Netherlands and the UK. He has designed and taught multi-disciplinary training courses related to oil and gas field exploration and development worldwide. After 11 years with a multinational company he became co-founder of TRACS International in 1992 where he is a Director.  [c.395]

Geolast AES DV nitrile mbber oil-resistant  [c.17]

The speed of a structural change is important. Some changes occur in only fractions of a second others are so slow that they become a problem to the engineer only when a component is held at a high temperature for some years. To a geologist the timescale is even wider during volcanic eruptions, phase changes (such as the formation of glasses) may occur in milliseconds but deep in the Earth s crust other changes (such as the formation of mineral deposits or the growth of large natural diamonds) occur at rates which can be measured only in terms of millennia.  [c.57]

Figures 5a and 5b are mass-resolved secondary ion images of gold (Au) and sulfur (S) in a cross-sectioned and polished pyrite (gold ore) sample acquired using the microscope imaging method. The gray level is proportional to the secondary ion intensity measured at each location, i.e., more gold or sulfur is found in darker locations. These images show that the gold, the geologist s primary interest, is localized in the outer few pm of the sulfur-containing pyrite grain. Figures 5a and 5b are mass-resolved secondary ion images of gold (Au) and sulfur (S) in a cross-sectioned and polished pyrite (gold ore) sample acquired using the microscope imaging method. The gray level is proportional to the secondary ion intensity measured at each location, i.e., more gold or sulfur is found in darker locations. These images show that the gold, the geologist s primary interest, is localized in the outer few pm of the sulfur-containing pyrite grain.
In some depositional environments, e.g. fluviatile channels, marked differences in reservoir thickness will be encountered. Hence the assumption of a constant thickness, or a linear trend in thickness across the field will no longer apply. In those cases a set of additional maps will be required. Usually a net oil sand (NOS) map will be prepared by the production geologist and then used to evaluate the hydrocarbon volume in place.  [c.156]

Suppose that four wells have been drilled in a field, and the geologist has identified three possible top sands maps based on the data available. These maps, along with the ranges of data for the other input parameters (N/G, S, cj), B ) have been used to generate an expectation curve for STOMP.  [c.178]

Chapter VI. Reductions with potassium borohydride (VI,11) Oppen-auer oxidation (VI,13) epoxidation and hydroxylation of ethylenic compounds (VI,15) Arndt Eistert reaction (VI,17) Darzens glycidio ester condensation (VI,18) Erlenmeyer azlactone reaction (VI,19) Mannich reaction (VI,20) Michael reaction (VI,21) Schmidt reaction (VI,23) Stobbe condensation (VI,24) Willgerodt reaction (VI,25) uns5mimetrical diaryls (VI,27) syntheses with organolithium compounds (VI,28) syntheses with organosodium compounds (VI,29) syntheses with organocadmium compounds (VI,30) some electrolytic syntheses (VI,31) chromatographic adsorption (VI,33) ring enlargement with diazomethane (VI,34).  [c.1191]

Methyl 6,8-dideoxy-6-(l-methyl-trans-4-propyl-L-pyrrolidin-2-ylcarbonylamino)-l-thio-D-erythro-D-galacto-octopyranoside  [c.620]

H. Galstet, pH Measurement Eundamentals, Methods, Applications, Instrumentation, VCH, New York, 1991.  [c.468]

Gelca.sting, Gelcasting (63) is a novel method of fabricating particulate bodies from ceramic slurries. Gelcasting employs in situ polymerization of organic, eg, acrylamide (qv), monomers to produce a gel stmcture that binds individual particles together to form a cohesive body. Net and near-net complex shapes such as turbine rotors can be cast in a relatively short period of time, and the high (up to 62 vol %) soHds concentrations improve the homogeneity of the cast and contribute to lower and more reproducible shrinkage during drying and sintering. Gelcast parts also have exceUent strength for handling and green machining.  [c.309]

Because clays (rocks) usually contain more than one mineral and the various clay minerals differ in chemical and physical properties, the term clay may signify entirely different things to different clay users. Whereas the geologist views clay as a raw material for shale, the pedologist as a dynamic system to support plant life, and the ceramist as a body to be processed in preparation for vitrification, the chemist and technologist view clay as a catalyst, adsorbent, filler, coater, or source of aluminum or lithium compounds, etc.  [c.193]

Processing Stability. A significant limitation on the selection of ceramic pigments is the set of processing conditions imposed during coating appbcation and firing (40). An engobe or body stain must be stable to the bisque fire, usually between cone 7 (1225°C) and cone 11 (1300°C). An underglaze color, or a colored glaze, must be stable to the glost fire, usually between cone 06 (1000°C) and cone 4 (1200°C), and to corrosion by the molten glaze ingredients. An overglaze or glass color needs only to be stable to the decorating fire by which it is appHed, usually between cone 020 (625°C) and cone 016 (775°). More important here is corrosion by the molten flux used in the appbcation.  [c.430]

Quadruple Mass Analyser Gloquad Manufecturer name  [c.766]

When the gelcoat has been given time to partially cure the main reinforcement is applied. Initially a coat of resin (unsaturated polyester is the most common) is brushed on and this is followed by layers of tailored glass mat positioned by hand. As shown in Fig. 4.67 a roller is then used to consolidate the mat and remove any trapped air. The advantage of this technique is that the strength and stiffness of the composite can be controlled by building up the thickness with further layers of mat and resin as desired. Curing takes place at room temperature but heat is sometimes applied to accelerate this. Ideally any trimming should be carried out before the curing is complete because the  [c.330]


See pages that mention the term Gelcoat : [c.376]    [c.23]    [c.119]    [c.231]    [c.233]    [c.591]    [c.438]    [c.443]    [c.443]    [c.439]    [c.97]    [c.30]    [c.34]    [c.35]    [c.40]    [c.40]    [c.41]    [c.41]    [c.62]    [c.32]    [c.87]    [c.299]    [c.327]    [c.203]    [c.20]    [c.14]    [c.205]    [c.644]    [c.261]    [c.569]    [c.330]    [c.333]    [c.335]    [c.17]   
Plastics engineering Изд.3 (2002) -- [ c.330 ]