Lycoramine


C4-Q2 Petroleum ether (Cj-Cs), ligroin (C,), straight-run gasoline  [c.133]

Le Bas method Leblanc process Lecigran Leciprime Lecithin  [c.560]

DADC monomer is a colorless Hquid of mild odor and a viscosity of 9 mPa-s(=cP) at 25°C. It is low in toxicity, but can produce skin irritation. It is fairly resistant to saponification by dilute alkaU. Contact with strong alkaU at higher temperature produces the more toxic aHyl alcohol Properties are given in Table 2 and the trade Hterature (10). DADC is soluble in common organic solvents and in methyl methacrylate, styrene, and vinyl acetate. It is partially soluble in amyl alcohol, gasoline, and ligroin. It is insoluble in ethylene glycol, glycerol, and water.  [c.81]

A A Dimethylamino)phenol. 4-Hydroxy-Ai,A/-dimethylaniline (20) forms large rhombic crystals from diethyl ether—hexane or diethyl ether—ligroin. It forms a salt with sulfuric acid, mp 208—210°C (187).  [c.315]

Alkylation and arylation of organosilanes occur readily with alkyl and aryl alkaU metal compounds. Yields from these reactions are good but are iafluenced by steric requirements on both silane and metal compounds. There is Httie iaductive effect by the organic groups attached to siUcon, as measured by the yield of products (126,127). These reactions proceed more readily ia tetrahydrofuran and ethyl ether than ia ligroin or petroleum ether, where R and are alkyl or aryl and M is Li, Na, or K.  [c.28]

Eur. Pat. Appl. EP 319,091 and 319,092 Q une 7, 1989), G. J. van Lookeren (to Unilever NV, Unilever Pic.).  [c.38]

McCreery R L 1996 Instrumentation for dispersive Raman spectroscopy Modern Techniques in Raman Spectroscopy ed J J Laserna (New York Wiley)  [c.1226]

Hendra P J 1996 Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy Modern Techniques in Raman Spectroscopy ed J J Laserna (New York Wley)  [c.1226]

Gomez J S 1996 Coherent Raman spectroscopy Modern Techniques in Raman Spectroscopy ed J J Laserna (New York Wiley) pp 305-42  [c.1229]

Turrell G and Dhamelincourt P 1996 Micro-Raman spectroscopy Modern Techniques in Raman Spectroscopy ed J J Laserna (New York Wiley) pp 109-42  [c.1231]

Hecht L and Barron L D 1996 Raman optical activity Modern Techniques in Raman Spectroscopy ed J J Laserna (New York Wley) pp 265-342  [c.1231]

Note. In the older types of Soxhiet extractor, an external tube ran from B up to the top of C for conveying the ascending column of hot vapour. This type had the disadvantage not only of being more easily broken, but also that the condensed liquid in C received very little heat, and therefore the extraction, being carried out by the lukewarm solvent, was usually very slow.  [c.38]

Sometinids termed ligroin. The author prefers to confine the term ligroin to the fractions of b.p. above 100°.  [c.174]

Place 1 g. of the anhydrous alcohol in a dry test-tube and add 0 5 ml. of a-naphthyl isocyanate (if the molecular weight is known, use a 10 per cent, excess of the reagent) insert a loose plug of cotton wool in the mouth of the tube. If no solid separates after shaking and standing for 5 minutes, warm on a water bath for 5-10 minutes, and then cool in ice. If no solid is now obtained, scratch the sides of the tube with a glass rod to induce crystallisation. Extract the solid with 5-10 ml. of boiling ligroin (light petroleum, b.p. 100-120°) this rapidly dissolves the a-naph-thylurethane but not the di-a-naphthylurea. Remove the urea (if any) by filtration and allow the hot ligroin solution to cool. If the urethane does not crystallise out, evaporate the solution to half its original volume, and allow to cool. Collect the crystals on a filter, dry, and determine the melting point. If the latter is not sharp, recrystaUise from light petroleum (b.p. 100-120°), alcohol, chloroform or carbon tetrachloride.  [c.264]

Introduce a solution of 100 g. of sodium bisulphite in 200 ml. of water and continue the stirring, preferably for 10 hours with exclusion of air. A thick precipitate separates after a few minutes. Collect the bisulphite compound by suction filtration, wash it with ether until colourless, and then decompose it in a flask with a lukewarm solution of 125 g. of sodium carbonate in 150 ml. of water. Separate the ketone layer, extract the aqueous layer with four 30 ml. portions of ether, dry the combined organic layers over anhydrous magnesium sulphate, remove the ether at atmospheric pressure, and distil the residual oil under reduced pressure from a Qaisen flask with fractionating side arm (Fig. II, 24, 5). Collect the cyclo-heptanone at 64r-65°/12 mm. the yield is 23 g.  [c.947]

Note. In the older types of Soxhiet extractor, an ex- Fig. 19. ternal tube ran from B up to the top of C for conveying the ascending column of hot vapour. This type had the disadvantage not only of being more easily broken, but also that the condensed liquid in C received very little heat, and therefore the extraction, being carried out by the lukewarm solvent, was usually very slow.  [c.38]

In a flow injection analysis the sample is injected into a flowing carrier stream that often is merged with additional streams carrying reagents. As the sample moves with the carrier stream, it both reacts with the contents of the carrier stream and any additional reagent streams, and undergoes dispersion. The resulting liagram of signal versus time bears some resemblance to a chromatogram. Unlike chromatography, however, flow injection analysis is not a separation technique. Because all components in a sample move with the carrier stream s flow rate, it is possible to introduce a second sample before the first sample reaches the detector. As a result, flow injection analysis is ideally suited for the rapid throughput of samples.  [c.659]

Table 3. Nutrient Requirements of Leghorn-Type Chickens at Specific Ages/ Weeks Table 3. Nutrient Requirements of Leghorn-Type Chickens at Specific Ages/ Weeks
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USD A) Northern Regional Research Center in Peoria, lU., carried out an extensive screening of over 500 species of plants as potential sources of papermaking fibers (3—6). The species were rated for agronomic potential, chemical composition, fiber properties, and physical characteristics. The species with the greatest potential were in the genera Hibiscus Crotalaria Sorghum Cannabis Gynenum lygerum, and Sinarundinaria.  [c.358]

LiS03p [13453-75-3] white powder 360 V s V s ethanol, ether, acetone, amyl alcohol, ethyl acetate i ligroin  [c.250]

Reactions have been brought about under heterogeneous conditions with an excess of aromatic compound serving as the solvent, and under homogeneous conditions, as in glacial acetic acid solution (45). Solvents used are diethyl ether, dioxane, dimethoxymethane, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, ethylene chloride, perchloroethylene, nitroben2ene, ligroin (light petroleum distillate), and carbon disulfide.  [c.554]

Cotton cards, on the other hand, were designed to process shorter fibers (15—30 mm) and a more narrow range of fiber diameters (15—30 p.m). Additional requirements include eliminating very short fiber segments and extracting nonfibrous material such as seed coat particles, leaf and stalk fragments, and dirt. A traditional cotton card consists of a roU-to-plate mat feeding assembly, a fiber-from-mat separating roU (lickerin), one large (1.1 m) cylinder and several curvilinear surfaces (revolving flats) between which the carding action takes place, a smaller (68 cm) cylinder which removes fibers (doffs) from the carding cylinder, and a web-condensing and sliver-coiling assembly. Cotton cards are generally one meter wide and typically operate at production rates in the 45—50 kg/h range.  [c.149]

As fibers in the feed mat pass between the feed toU and feed plate, they ate separated by metallic wine teeth on the lickerin toU and carried to an air venturi where they ate stripped and tumbled until they strike a moving, perforated collection surface. At the collection surface, the airborne fibers foUow paths of least resistance and accumulate in a self-leveling manner while the air passes through perforations. Fiber orientation in the web is isotropic in layers corresponding to the number of fibers transferred from the wine teeth to the air-transportation 2one, the intensity of the air, and the speed of the collection surface.  [c.151]

Properties. Hydroxyhydroquiaone forms platelets or prisms (mp 140.5°C). The compound is easily soluble ia water, ethanol, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate and is very spariagly soluble ia chloroform, carbon disulfide, benzene, and ligroin.  [c.380]

American Ligurian, Inc. (Stanford, Connecticut) is marketing a pyrolysis process developed in Italy, which generates steam for hot water, air heating, dryers, kilns, and similar installations. A modular plant produces 8000 kg/h of steam from 1 tih of tires. The pyrolysis process produces 0.9 t of fuel ok, 270 t of steel, and 54 t of ash annually. Gas emissions meet the strictest environmental standards (16).  [c.15]

F. J. Zuiderweg and N. van Lookeren Campagne, Chem. Eng. (Eondon) (220), CE223 (1968).  [c.125]


See pages that mention the term Lycoramine : [c.259]    [c.239]    [c.408]    [c.781]    [c.1228]    [c.1676]    [c.2639]    [c.2756]    [c.30]    [c.154]    [c.155]    [c.264]    [c.523]    [c.562]    [c.22]    [c.102]    [c.94]    [c.405]    [c.386]    [c.406]    [c.406]    [c.406]    [c.44]    [c.339]   
The logic of chemical synthesis (1989) -- [ c.391 ]