Storage


Also described in this section are the labeled common storage bloc)cs associated with the thermodynamic subroutines.  [c.289]

Common Storage None  [c.291]

Common Storage None  [c.293]

Glossary of Principal Variable Names (plus see common storage descriptions)  [c.296]

Glossary of Principal Variable Names (plus see common storage descriptions)  [c.300]

Common Storage /PURE/  [c.303]

Glossary of Principal Variable Names (plus see common storage descriptions)  [c.303]

Common Storage /PURE/  [c.308]

Also see common-block storage descriptions.)  [c.309]

Common Storage /PURE/  [c.310]

Glossary of Principal Variable Names (plus see common storage descriptions)  [c.311]

Common Storage /BINARY/  [c.313]

Glossary of Principal Variable Names (See common storage descriptions.)  [c.313]

LABELED COMMON STORAGE  [c.315]

The computer subroutines for calculation of vapor-liquid equilibrium separations, including determination of bubble-point and dew-point temperatures and pressures, are described and listed in this Appendix. These are source routines written in American National Standard FORTRAN (FORTRAN IV), ANSI X3.9-1978, and, as such, should be compatible with most computer systems with FORTRAN IV compilers. Approximate storage requirements for these subroutines are given in Appendix J their execution times are strongly dependent on the separations being calculated but can be estimated (CDC 6400) from the times given for the thermodynamic subroutines they call (essentially all computation effort is in these thermodynamic subroutines).  [c.318]

Common Storage None  [c.320]

Common Storage None  [c.327]

Common Storage None  [c.331]

The computer subroutine for calculation of liquid-liquid equilibrium separations is described and listed in this Appendix. This is a source routine written in American National Standard FORTRAN (FORTRAN IV), ANSI X3.9-1978, and, as such, should be compatible with most computer systems with FORTRAN IV compilers. The approximate storage requirements for this subroutine are given in Appendix J the execution time is strongly dependent on the separation being calculated but can be estimated (CDC 6400) from the times given for the thermodynamic subroutines it calls (essentially all computation effort is in these thermodynamic subroutines).  [c.333]

Cominon Storage None  [c.335]

KEE Temporary storage of control variable (see KEY).  [c.335]

KP Temporary storage of equilibrium ratio for raffinate sol-  [c.335]

KS Temporary storage of equilibrium ratio for extract solvent.  [c.335]

Common Storage /PURE/  [c.342]

See labeled common storage description for /PURE/ and /BINARY/ (Appendix E).  [c.342]

PARCH changes all parameters for N components in the common storage blocks /PURE/ and /BINARY/ either by replacing a previous component and/or its parameters or by adding components, thus increasing the library of M ( < 100) components.  [c.344]

Common Storage /PORE/  [c.345]

See labeled common storage description for /PURE/ and /BINARY/ (Appendix E).  [c.345]

PARCH CHANGES THE PARAMETERS FOR N COMPONENTS IN THE COMMON STORAGE  [c.345]

EXECUTION TIME AND STORAGE REQUIREMENTS OF THERMODYNAMIC SUBROUTINES  [c.352]

The program storage requirements will depend somewhat on the computer and FORTRAN compiler involved. The execution times can be corrected approximately to those for other computer systems by use of factors based upon bench-mark programs representative of floating point manipulations. For example, execution times on a CDC 6600 would be less by a factor of roughly 4 than those given in the tcible and on a CDC 7600 less by a factor of roughly 24.  [c.352]

TABLE J-1 Computer Storage and Execution Time Requirements for Thermodynamic Subroutines  [c.353]

Subroutine or storage Conditions Execution Time (ms) on CDC 6400 for  [c.353]

Consider the simple process shown in Fig. 4.10. Feed material is withdrawn from storage using a pump. The feed material is preheated in a heat exchanger before being fed to a batch reactor. Once the reactor is full, further heating takes place inside the reactor using steam to the reactor jacket before the reaction proceeds. During the later stages of the reaction, cooling water is applied to the reactor jacket. Once the reaction is complete, the reactor product is withdrawn using a pump. The reactor product is cooled in a heat exchanger before going to storage.  [c.116]

Clearly, the time chart shown in Fig. 4.14 indicates that individual items of equipment have a poor utilization i.e., they are in use for only a small fraction of the batch cycle time. To improve the equipment utilization, overlap batches as shown in the time-event chart in Fig. 4.15. Here, more than one batch, at difierent processing stages, resides in the process at any given time. Clearly, it is not possible to recycle directly from the separators to the reactor, since the reactor is fed at a time different from that at which the separation is carried out. A storage tank is needed to hold the recycle material. This material is then used to provide part of the feed for the next batch. The final flowsheet for batch operation is shown in Fig. 4.16. Equipment utilization might be improved further by various methods which are considered in Chap. 8 when economic tradeoffs are discussed.  [c.121]

Another option to improve utilization of equipment is, instead of adding a reactor in parallel, installing intermediate storage. Figure 8.9 shows the time-event chart with intermediate storage between the reactor and evaporator and between the evaporator and stripper. The evaporator step is no longer constrained to start on completion of the reaction step and start the stripping step on completion of the evaporation step. The individual steps can be decoupled via the intermediate storage. This maintains the original batch cycle time of 2.6 hours but allows, as shown in Fig. 8.9, the elimination of dead time in the evaporation and stripping steps. Now more evaporation and stripping steps can be carried out and the size of the evaporator and stripper reduced accordingly. This time the capital cost of intermediate storage is traded off against reduced capital cost of the evaporator and stripper. In Fig. 8.9, the intermediate storage between the reactor and evaporator has a significant effect on equipment utilization. The intermediate storage between the reactor and stripper has a less pronounced effect and would be more difficult to justify economically.  [c.250]

The computer subroutines for calculation of vapor-phase and liquid-phase fugacity (activity) coefficients, reference fugac-ities, and molar enthalpies, as well as vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibrium ratios, are described and listed in this Appendix. These are source routines written in American National Standard FORTRAN (FORTRAN IV), ANSI X3.9-1978, and, as such, should be compatible with most computer systems with FORTRAN IV compilers. Approximate storage requirements and CDC 6400 execution times for these subroutines are given in Appendix J.  [c.289]

BUS calculated second virial coefficients for pure compoments and all binary pairs in a mixture of N components (N 20) at specified temperature. These coefficients are placed in common storage /VIRIAL/.  [c.303]

TEMPERATURE T(K>. COEFFICIENTS ARE RETURNED IN COMMON STORAGE/V15 IAL WITH BUfJ)=B(L), L=( I-l ) I/2 -J. IF CARBOXYLIC ACIDS ARE PRESENT  [c.304]

The computer storage requirements (floating point machine words) for the Icibeled common storage blocks and, approximately, for the principal computer subroutines are given in Tcible J-1.  [c.352]

One common reason for imposing constraints results from areas of integrity A process is often normally designed to have logically identifiable sections or areas. An example might be reaction area and separation area of the process. These areas are kept separate for reasons such as start-up, shutdown, operational fiexibility, safety, etc. The areas are often made operationally independent through the use of intermediate storage of process materials between the areas. Such independent areas are generally described as areas of integrity and impose constraints on the ability to transfer heat. Clearly, to maintain operational indepedence, two areas cannot be dependent on each other for heating and cooling by recovery.  [c.181]


See pages that mention the term Storage : [c.296]    [c.299]    [c.304]    [c.340]    [c.343]    [c.118]    [c.249]    [c.250]    [c.250]    [c.250]   
See chapters in:

Hazardous chemicals handbook Изд.2  -> Storage

Automotive quality systems handbook  -> Storage


Hazardous chemicals handbook Изд.2 (2002) -- [ c.401 ]

Applied Process Design for Chemical and Petrochemical Plants, Volume 1 (1999) -- [ c.469 ]