Radial bearing temperature


Proeess flow measurement at inlet or diseharge of maehine Radial-bearing temperature thermoeouple or resistanee temperature element embedded in eaeh bearing, or temperature at lube oil diseharge of eaeh bearing.  [c.661]

Figure 8-27. Typical radial bearing temperature sensor installation. Figure 8-27. Typical radial bearing temperature sensor installation.
The radial and thrust bearings shall be equipped with resis-tanee temperature deteetors (RTDs). Eaeh radial bearing shall have two embedded RTDs, and eaeh side of the thrust bearing shall have two embedded RTDs. The RTDs shall be 100 at 0°C, platinum with dual element. The RTDs shall be loeated at positions in the bearings where the highest temperature is antieipated. They shall be terminated in loeal junetion boxes suitable for housing the RTD/mA transmitters working on a 4-20 mA signal.  [c.315]

Active magnetic bearings attain speeds up to 200 m/s (656 ft/sec) on radial bearings, and 350 m/s (1,148 ft/sec) on axial or thrust bearings. A large variety of process fluids are allowed to flood or surround these bearings. Allowable operating temperatures range from -253°C (-420°F) to as high as +450°C (+840°F). There is no measurable friction and vibration is rarely experienced.  [c.337]

Provides a purchase specification to facilitate the manufacture, procurement, installation, and testing of vibration, axial position, and bearing temperature monitoring systems for petroleum, chemical, and gas industry services. Covers the minimum requirements for monitoring radial shaft  [c.155]

Figure B-29. Radial bearing with a temperature sensor installed. Courtesy of A-C Compressor Corporation) Figure B-29. Radial bearing with a temperature sensor installed. Courtesy of A-C Compressor Corporation)
Indications of misalignment in rotating machinery are shaft wobbling, excessive vibration (in both radial and axial directions), excessive bearing temperature (even if adequate lubrication is present), noise, bearing wear pattern, and coupling wear.  [c.915]

The two faetors, whieh most affeet high turbine effieieneies, are pressure ratios and temperature. The axial flow eompressor, whieh produees the high-pressure gas in the turbine, has seen dramatie ehange as the gas turbine pressure ratio has inereased from 7 1 to 40 1. The inerease in pressure ratio inereases the gas turbine thermal effieieney when aeeompanied with the inerease in turbine firing temperature. The inerease in the pressure ratio inereases the overall effieieney at a given temperature, however inereasing the pressure ratio beyond a eertain value at any given firing temperature ean aetually result in lowering the overall eyele effieieney. It should also be noted that the very high-pressure ratios tend to reduee the operating range of the turbine eompressor. This eauses the turbine eompressor to be mueh more intolerant to dirt build-up in the inlet air filter and on the eompressor blades and ereates large drops in eyele effieieney and performanee. In some eases, it ean lead to eompressor surge, whieh in turn ean lead to a flameout, or even serious damage and failure of the eompressor blades and the radial and thrust bearings of the gas turbine.  [c.12]

Figure 2-2 shows the effeet on the overall eyele effieieney of the inereasing pressure ratio and the firing temperature. The inerease in the pressure ratio increases the overall efficiency at a given firing temperature however, increasing the pressure ratio beyond a certain value at any given firing temperature can actually result in lowering the overall cycle efficiency. It should also be noted that the very high-pressure ratios tend to reduce the operating range of the turbine compressor. This causes the turbine compressor to be much more intolerant to dirt build up in the inlet air filter and on the compressor blades and creates large drops in cycle efficiency and performance. In some cases, it can lead to compressor surge, which in turn can lead to a flameout, or even serious damage and failure of the compressor blades and the radial and thrust bearings of the gas turbine.  [c.61]

Thermometers should be mounted in the oil piping to measure the oil at the outlet of eaeh radial and thrust bearing and into and out of the eoolers. It is also advisable to measure bearing metal temperatures.  [c.547]

Angular contact ball bearings are available in single and double row designs as well as four-point contact ball bearings. They are designed for a combined load and provide stiff bearing arrangements. Angular contact ball bearings have raceways m the inner and outer rings, which arc displaced with respect to each other in the direction of the bearing axis. This means that they are particularly suitable for the accommodation of combined loads (i.e., simultaneously acting radial and thrust loads such as for orbital sanders). The benefits are high-load carrying capacity and speed capability, low operating temperatures, long relubrication inteiwals and quiet operation.  [c.126]

API 670, Vibration, Axial Position, and Bearing Temperature Monitor ing System includes temperature in its scope. For several years, radial and thrust bearings have been instrumented using either thermocouples or RTDs, Each user specifying the instrumentation had the bearings fitted in his own way. While this gave good data in some instances, it was not consistent, Furthermore, the data from one user could not be compared with the data from another. In fact, because of different influences by the various compressor vendors, one large user could not coirelate his own experience, While the addition of bearing temperature monitoring to the API standard has numerous benefits, the more immediate one is the establishment of a standard method of installation. Figures 8-27 and 8-28 show the recommended installation position on the radial and thrust bearing respectively.  [c.344]

The two recognized standard sensors are the ISA type J thermocouple (iron-constantan) and the 100 ohm at 0°C platinum 3-wire RTD. Additional attributes such as TFE insulation and stainless overbraid are specified. The sensors are installed in a drilled hole at the location shown, with the objective being to place the sensor approximately. 030 inches to the rear of the base of the babbitt. Surprisingly, steel conducts at approximately the same coefficient as the babbitt, so there is no significant temperature drop at the metal interface. The sensor is potted in place, with some of the over braid included, to provide strain relief. An alternate to potting is to use a spring and clip arrangement, which has the advantage of an easy sensor replacement. Figure 8-29 shows a radial bearing with a temperature sensor installed. Figure 8-30 depicts an instrumented thrust bearing.  [c.345]

Radially spHt constmction is typically a diffusor design, offering the advantage of reduced radial thmst, which is better from the standpoint of lowering shaft deflections, resulting in longer Life of seals and bearings. The reason for radial thmst reduction is an inherent geometrical symmetry of the diffusor (having multiple vanes), which results in uniform pressure distribution at the impeller periphery. The volute design has an uneven pressure distribution, which results in radial load. The double volute has two tongues, called cutwaters, which, as compared to a single volute, results in more uniform pressure distribution around the impeller periphery. This distribution is not as uniform as in a diffusor design. The disassembly of the diffusor pump is more involved because a complete pump must be discoimected from the piping for service. Both designs are limited to temperatures around 175°C (350°F), as deterrnined by gasket sealing and safety considerations. For more critical and higher temperature appHcations such as boiler feed services and refinery appHcations of volatile or hot (>175°C) temperatures, a segmental ring design is enclosed into a cast or forged barrel, which becomes a pressure-containing vessel having a fully confined gasket. This gasket seals the ends via suction and discharge heads.  [c.294]


See pages that mention the term Radial bearing temperature : [c.319]    [c.1219]   
Compressors selections and sizing (1997) -- [ c.0 ]