Hadfield steel


Figure 7.8. Material hardness of Hadfield steel subject to shock compression of various peak pressures and pulse durations. Figure 7.8. Material hardness of Hadfield steel subject to shock compression of various peak pressures and pulse durations.
A.R. Champion and R.W. Rohde, Hugoniot Equation of State and the Effect of Short Stress Amplitude and Duration on the Hardness of Hadfield Steel, J. Appl. Phys. 41,2213-2223 (1970).  [c.258]

Hatfield, W. H J. Iron and Steel Institute, 108, 103 (1923)  [c.584]

Champion and Rohde [42] investigate the effects of shock-wave amplitude and duration on the Rockwell C hardness [41] and microstructure of Hadfield steel over the pressure range of 0.4-48 GPa (pulse duration of 0.065 s, 0.230 ls, and 2.2 ps). The results are shown in Fig. 7.8. In addition to the very pronounced effeet of pulse duration on hardness shown in Fig. 7.8, postshoek electron microscope observations indicate that it is the final dislocation density and not the specific microstructure that is important in determining the hardness.  [c.235]

MnS which passes into the slag and prevents the formation of FeS which would induce brittleness, and it also combines with oxygen to form MnO, so preventing the formation of bubbles and pinholes in the cold steel. Secondly, the presence of Mn as an alloying metal increases the hardness of the steel. The hard, non-magnetic Hadfield steel containing about 13% Mn and 1.25% C, is the best known, and is used when resistance to severe mechanical shock and wear is required, e.g. for excavators, dredgers, rail crossings, etc.  [c.1042]

R. D. G. Cooper, L. D. Hatfield, and D. O. Spry, Accounts Chem. R j". 6, 32 (1973) P. G. Sammes, Chem. Rev. l(i, 113 (1976) R. J. Stoodley, Tetrahedron 31, 2321 (1975).  [c.42]

Much of the information available on resistance of nickel-iron alloys to corrosion by mineral acids is summarised by Marsh. In general, corrosion rates decrease sharply as the nickel content is increased from 0 to 30-40%, with little further improvement above this level. The value of the nickel addition is most pronounced in conditions where hydrogen evolution is the major cathodic reaction, i.e. under conditions of low aeration and agitation. Results reported by Hatfield show that the rates of attack of Fe-25Ni alloy in sulphuric and hydrochloric acid solutions, although much lower than those of mild steel, are still appreciable (Tables 3.35 and 3.36). In solutions of nitric acid, nickel-iron alloys show very high rates of corrosion.  [c.580]


High pressure shock compression of solids (1992) -- [ c.235 ]