Gypsum


Stassfurt deposits Deposits of various salts mined at Stassfurt chiefly for potassium (car-nallite). Kainite, kieserite and gypsum are also present, Bta is obtained as a by-product.  [c.371]

Solids materials that are insoluble in hydrocarbon or water can be entrained in the crude. These are called bottom sediments and comprise fine particles of sand, drilling mud, rock such as feldspar and gypsum, metals in the form of minerals or in their free state such as iron, copper, lead, nickel, and vanadium. The latter can come from pipeline erosion, storage tanks, valves and piping systems, etc. whatever comes in contact with the crude oil.  [c.327]

Chlorides of sodium, magnesium and calcium are almost always the prevailing compounds, along with gypsum and calcium carbonate.  [c.328]

F.J. Hancock, S.C. Gibson - Mitsui Babcock Energy. A. McNab, D. Reilly Uni. of Strathclyde. UK.  [c.765]

W. L. Earl, P. O. Fritz, A. A. V. Gibson, and J. H. Lunsford, J. Phys. Chem., 91, 2091 (1987).  [c.597]

Because it is necessary to exclude some substances, including some crystals, from the Nemst heat theorem, Lewis and Gibson (1920) introduced the concept of a perfect crystal and proposed the following modification as a definitive statement of the third law of themiodynamics (exact wording due to Lewis and Randall (1923))  [c.370]

We wish to express our very sincere thanks to Dr. W. H Mills, F.R.S., and to Dr. Hamilton McCombie, for much advice and help in the compilation of this book to Prof. C. S. Gibson, F.R.S., for suggestions with regard to the needs of medical students and to Prof. E. L. Hirst, F.R.S., for advice upon certain preparations in the carbohydrate series. We are also greatly indebted to Dr. F. B. Kipping and Dr. P. Maitland for many suggestions based on the experience obtained from their own first-year medical and Tripos classes. We gratefully acknowledge the help we have received from Dr. P. J. G. Mann of the Cambridge University Biochemical Department, who read over the section on Enzymes and made many valuable suggestions, and from Dr. F. J. W, Roughton, F.R.S., and Dr. G. A. Millikan, who kindly furnished the details of experiments concerning carbonic anhydrase.  [c.593]

Sulfur occurs native in the vicinity of volcanos and hot springs. It is widely distributed in nature as iron pyrites, galena, sphalerite, cinnabar, stibnite, gypsum, epsom salts, celestite, barite, etc.  [c.38]

Calcium is a metallic element, fifth in abundance in the earth s crust, of which if forms more than 3%. It is an essential constituent of leaves, bones, teeth, and shells. Never found in nature uncombined, it occurs abundantly as limestone, gypsum, and fluorite. Apatite is the fluorophosphate or chlorophosphate of calcium.  [c.47]

We wish to express our very sincere thanks to Dr. W. H Mills, F.R.S., and to Dr. Hamilton McCombie, for much advice and help in the compilation of this book to Prof. C. S. Gibson, F.R.S., for suggestions with regard to the needs of medical students and to Prof. E. L. Hirst, F.R.S., for advice upon certain preparations in the carbohydrate series. We are also greatly indebted to Dr. F. B. Kipping and Dr. P. Maitland for many suggestions based on the experience obtained from their own first-year medical and Tripos classes. We gratefully acknowledge the help we have received from Dr. P. J. G. Mann of the Cambridge University Biochemical Department, who read over the section on Enzymes and made many valuable suggestions, and from Dr. F. J. W. Roughton, F.R.S., and Dr. G. A. Millikan, who kindly furnished the details of experiments concerning carbonic anhydrase.  [c.599]

Gibson, T. W. Erman, W. F. 1969, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 91, 4771  [c.368]

Crisp, P. T. Eckert, J. M. Gibson, N. A. The Determination of Anionic Surfactants in Natural and Waste Waters, /.  [c.447]

Calcia [1305-78-8] Calci-Bind Calcimar Calcimycin [52665-69-7] Calcination Calcined gypsum Calcined limestone  [c.149]

Gymnothorax Gynomyk Gyp muds Gypsum  [c.458]

Gypsum [7778-18-9] Gypsum board Gypsum plaster board Gypsy  [c.458]

CaSO4-0-5HiO, prepared by heating gypsum at 130 "C, is used as plaster of Paris. Gypsum and anhydrite are used for H2SO4 production and gypsum is used as a soil additive and as an inert additive to pharmaceuticals and insecticides.  [c.77]

Cements are commonly made by heating a mixture of limestone and clay to about 1700 C. The product is ground with gypsum. Chemically cements consist of a mixture of calcium silicates and aluminates with some sulphate present. World production 1976 730 megatonnes.  [c.87]

An important problem involving reactions of solid surfaces is the deterioration of wall paintings and stone monuments. A significant source of damage to frescoes is the presence of water, which can degrade the binding media, alter pigments, and promote microbial growth and the collection of dirt and pollutants. While environmental factors such as relative humidity and surface temperature can be controlled by conservators, the presence of hygroscopic salts facilitate water absorption. Deliquescent salts, those that absorb water to produce a saturated solution at the surface of the painting, are especially problematic. Ferroni and co-workers have studied the cycles of deliquescence and recrystallization in calcium nitrate, Ca(N03)2 4H2O [176, 177]. Their understanding of the reactions at solid surfaces of paintings has helped define conditions to minimize their wetting by water vapor and subsequent deterioration. Stone sculptures and buildings decay through a process where the calcium carbonate reacts with sulfur oxides found in atmospheric pollutants to produce a more soluble salt. Gypsum (calcium sulfate dihydrate) produces black scabs on stone surfaces which not only ruin the appearance of the object but weaken the material and eventually flake off to expose a fresh surface to continue the cycle of decay (see Ref. [178]).  [c.284]

In the Lewis and Gibson statement of the third law, the notion of a perfect crystalline substance , while understandable, strays far from the macroscopic logic of classical thennodynamics and some scientists have been reluctant to place this statement in the same category as the first and second laws of thennodynamics. Fowler and Guggenheim (1939), noting drat the first and second laws both state universal limitations on processes that are experunentally possible, have pointed out that the principle of the unattainability of absolute zero, first enunciated by Nemst (1912) expresses a similar universal limitation  [c.371]

Gibson J B, Goland A N, Milgram M and Vineyard G H 1960 Dynamics of radiation damage Rhys. Rev. Series 2 120 1229-53  [c.1826]

Large deposits of free sulphur occur in America, Sicily and Japan. Combined sulphur occurs as sulphides, for example galena, PbS, zinc blende, ZnS, and iron pyrites, FeSj, and as sulphates, notably as gypsum or anhydrite, CaS04.  [c.261]

R.H. Bisseling, R. Kosloff, R.B. Gerber, M.A. Ratner, L. Gibson and C. Cerjan, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 2760 (1987).  [c.378]

Gibson K D and H A Scheraga 1987. Revised Algorithms for the Build-up Procedure for Predicting lAotein Conformations by Energy Minimization, journal of Computational Chemistry 8 826-834.  [c.523]

H A Scheraga has devised many novel methods with his colleagues for exploring the cor formational space of peptides and proteins [Scheraga 1993]. Each new method is rigorousl evaluated using a standard test molecule, met-enkephalin (H-Tyr-Gly-Phy—Met-OH One method is the build-up approach, in which the peptide is constructed from thre dimensional amino acid templates [Gibson and Scheraga 1987]. Each template correspond to a low-energy region of the Ramachandran map. To explore the conformational space of peptide, a dipeptide fragment is first constructed by joining together all possible pairs c templates available to the first two amino acids. Each dipeptide fragment is minimise and the lowest-energy structures are retained for the next step, in which the third amin acid is connected. The peptide is gradually built up in this way, with energy minimisatio and selection of the lowest-energy structures at each stage.  [c.533]

Gibson K D and H A Scheraga 1987. Revised Algorithms for the Build-up PrcKedure for Predi Protein Conformations by Energy Minimization. Journal of Computational Chemistry 8 826-83-  [c.575]

I. K. Rotennan, K. D. Gibson, H. A. Scheraga, J. Biomol. Struct. Dynam. 7, 391 (1989). I. K. Rotennan, M. H. Lambert, K. D. Gibson, H. A. Scheraga, J. Biomol. Struct. Dynam. 7, 421 (1989).  [c.59]

C = C triple bonds are hydrated to yield carbonyl groups in the presence of mercury (II) ions (see pp. 52, 57) or by successive treatment with boranes and H2O2. The first procedure gives preferentially the most highly substituted ketone, the latter the complementary compound with high selectivity (T.W. Gibson, 1969).  [c.131]

Guanajuatite, see Bismuth selenide Gypsum, see Calcium sulfate 2-water  [c.274]

Spills from production faciUties and pipelines often iavolve both oil and brine, siace most oil reservoirs float on top of concentrated btines, and both are produced ia later stages of production. The brine is typically separated from the oil and re-iajected iato the reservoir, but some is retained ia many production pipelines. The environmental impact of spilled brine can be quite deleterious. Not only is salt toxic to most plants, and can inhibit many soil bacteria, but it also can have a major effect on the soil stmcture by altering the physical properties of clays. Successful bioremediation strategies must therefore include remediating the brine. In wet regions the salt is eventually diluted by rainfall, but in arid regions, and to speed the process in wetter regions, gypsum is often added to restore soil porosity.  [c.30]


See pages that mention the term Gypsum : [c.6]    [c.32]    [c.34]    [c.75]    [c.76]    [c.88]    [c.197]    [c.316]    [c.345]    [c.378]    [c.119]    [c.2922]    [c.358]    [c.480]    [c.578]    [c.1298]    [c.513]    [c.704]    [c.156]    [c.458]    [c.1014]   
Sourse beds of petroleum (1942) -- [ c.413 ]

Modern inorganic chemistry (1975) -- [ c.261 ]

Chemistry of the elements (1998) -- [ c.109 , c.122 ]

Standard Handbook of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Volume 1 (1996) -- [ c.0 ]