Reciprocal Approach


Although the reciprocal approach potentially enables the screening of large numbers of compounds, only the advent of combinatorial chemistry brought about the tools required for the synthesis of large libraries of potential selectors in a very short period of time. In addition, using the methods of combinatorial chemistry, novel strategies different from those of the reciprocal approach could also be developed.  [c.62]

While the reciprocal approach is best suited for the development of a CSP for a single, well-known racemic target, the library-on-bead technique is more useful for the initial scanning of various targets to find a lead selector. It is easy to imagine a development laboratory with a number of columns with immobilized libraries of selectors used to screen target racemates in very rapid fashion. Such pre-screening would suggest the type of selector chemistry that may be best suited for a specific target. The next step would either involve deconvolution of the library on bead or reciprocal testing of parallel libraries of selectors with analogous core chemistries.  [c.90]

Regression models based on a straight line, despite their apparent complexity, use the simplest functional relationship between two variables. In many cases, calibration curves show a pronounced curvature at high concentrations of analyte (see Figure 5.3b). One approach to constructing a calibration curve when curvature exists is to seek a transformation function that will make the data linear. Logarithms, exponentials, reciprocals, square roots, and trigonometric functions have all been used in this capacity. A plot of y versus log x is a typical example. Such transformations are not without complications. Perhaps the most obvious is that data that originally has a uniform variance for the y values will not maintain that uniform variance when the variable is transformed.  [c.127]

The relaxation and creep experiments that were described in the preceding sections are known as transient experiments. They begin, run their course, and end. A different experimental approach, called a dynamic experiment, involves stresses and strains that vary periodically. Our concern will be with sinusoidal oscillations of frequency v in cycles per second (Hz) or co in radians per second. Remember that there are 2ir radians in a full cycle, so co = 2nv. The reciprocal of CO gives the period of the oscillation and defines the time scale of the experiment. In connection with the relaxation and creep experiments, we observed that the maximum viscoelastic effect was observed when the time scale of the experiment is close to r. At a fixed temperature and for a specific sample, r or the spectrum of r values is fixed. If it does not correspond to the time scale of a transient experiment, we will lose a considerable amount of information about the viscoelastic response of the system. In a dynamic experiment it may  [c.173]

The other important stabilizing force is hydration, because hydrophilic coUoids are involved. The waters of hydration modify the exterior of the particle, so that it approaches the properties of the bulk water. Owing to this, the particles show no tendency to approach or to coalesce. The destabilizing effect of the Brownian movement brings the particles into contact simply because of their random wanderings through the solution. If two particles happen to coUide or penetrate each other s repulsive sphere, they may be held together by van der Waals forces. These forces are proportional to the reciprocal of the distance between the particle to the fifth power. This means that attractive forces generaUy act over a much shorter distance than do repulsive forces.  [c.276]

Mechanical thermocompression may employ reciprocating, rotary positive-displacement, centrifugal, or axial-flow compressors. Positive-displacement compressors are impractical for all but the smallest capacities, such as portable seawater evaporators. Axial-flow compressors can be built for capacities of more than 472 mVs (1 X 10 ftVmin). Centrifugal compressors are usually cheapest for the intermediate-capacity ranges that are normally encountered. In all cases, great care must be taken to keep entrainment at a minimum, since the vapor becomes superheated on compression and any liquid present will evaporate, leaving the dissolved solids behind. In some cases a vapor-scrubbing tower may be installed to protect the compressor. A mechanical recompression evaporator usually requires more heat than is available from the compressed vapor. Some of this extra heat can be obtained by preheating the feed with the condensate and, if possible, with the product. Rather extensive heat-exchange systems with close approach temperatures are usually justified, especially if the evaporator is operated at high temperature to reduce the volume of vapor to be compressed. When the product is a sohd, an elutriation leg such as that shown in Fig. 11-1225 is advantageous, since it cools the product almost to feed temperature. The remaining heat needed to maintain the evaporator in operation must be obtained from outside sources.  [c.1143]

Regression models based on a straight line, despite their apparent complexity, use the simplest functional relationship between two variables. In many cases, calibration curves show a pronounced curvature at high concentrations of analyte (see Figure 5.3b). One approach to constructing a calibration curve when curvature exists is to seek a transformation function that will make the data linear. Logarithms, exponentials, reciprocals, square roots, and trigonometric functions have all been used in this capacity. A plot of y versus log x is a typical example. Such transformations are not without complications. Perhaps the most obvious is that data that originally has a uniform variance for the y values will not maintain that uniform variance when the variable is transformed.  [c.127]

An entirely different approach to fast Ewald sums is based on the following observation. If the charges of the unit cell happened to be laid out on a regular K X K X K grid, then the structure factors. S (m) for reciprocal vectors within the K X K X K array could be calculated very quickly using the fast Eourier transform (FET) algorithm. In fact, in the case that [3 is chosen such that the direct sum can be truncated at a regular cutoff, the order N number of structure factors necessary to converge the reciprocal sum can be calculated in order N log N using the FT T, making the whole Ewald sum an order N log N calculation. The particle mesh approaches to Ewald summation are based on reducing the usual case of irregularly positioned charges to that of regularly gridded charges.  [c.110]

The original particle mesh (P3M) approach of Hockney and Eastwood [42] treats the reciprocal space problem from the standpoint of numerically solving the Poisson equation under periodic boundary conditions with the Gaussian co-ion densities as the source density p on the right-hand side of Eq. (10). Although a straightforward approach is to  [c.110]

This case study discusses the design of a reciprocating mechanical press for the manufacture of can lids drawn from sheet steel material. The authors were involved in the early stages of the product development process to advise the company designing the press in choosing between a number of design alternatives with the goal of ensuring its reliability. The authors used a probabilistic approach to the problem to provide the necessary degree of clarity between the competing solutions.  [c.244]

As the distance between the two particles varies, they are subject to these long-range r " attractive forces (which some authors refer to collectively as van der Waals forces). Upon very close approach they will experience a repulsive force due to electron-electron repulsion. This repulsive interaction is not theoretically well characterized, and it is usually approximated by an empirical reciprocal power of distance of separation. The net potential energy is then a balance of the attractive and repulsive components, often described by Eq. (8-16), the Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential.  [c.393]

Because of the hyperbolic shape of versus [S] plots, Vmax only be determined from an extrapolation of the asymptotic approach of v to some limiting value as [S] increases indefinitely (Figure 14.7) and is derived from that value of [S] giving v= V(nax/2. However, several rearrangements of the Michaelis-Menten equation transform it into a straight-line equation. The best known of these is the Lineweaver-Burk double-reciprocal plot  [c.440]

Fig. 3-11. Concept of reciprocal combinatorial approach to the preparation of chiral stationary phase. (Reprinted with permission from ref. [55]. Copyright 1999, American Chemical Society.) Fig. 3-11. Concept of reciprocal combinatorial approach to the preparation of chiral stationary phase. (Reprinted with permission from ref. [55]. Copyright 1999, American Chemical Society.)
The reciprocal strategy is best suited for typical situations encountered in the industry that require the preparation of a highly selective CSP for the separation of only a single racemic product such as a drug. Since single enantiomers of that compound must be prepared for the testing, the preparation of a reciprocal packing with a single enantiomer attached to the support does not present a serious problem. Once this CSP is available, a broad array of libraries of potential racemic selectors can easily be screened. Although we selected a simple Biginelli three-component condensation reaction to prepare the library of selectors based on non-natural compounds, many other libraries of chiral organic compounds could also be screened as potential selectors for the chiral recognition of specific targets. This approach provides one more benefit when such an extensive study is carried out with structurally related families of compounds typical of chemical libraries, a better understanding of chiral recognition may quickly be generated and used for design of even more successful selectors.  [c.83]

It is beyond the scope of this chapter to provide detailed design procedures for systems that may be required to prevent or reduce gas pulsations in a reciprocating compressor system. However, this chapter does attempt to (1) alert the design engineer that the topic does need to be addressed, (2) provide preliminary design methods for parts of the system design, and (3) direct the reader to references for the most effective design approach known at this writing.  [c.580]

Most of the reactions applied to amines can also be transferred to alcohols (Eig. 7-5). One large group of chiral alcohols are the (i-adrenoreceptor blockers, for which a variety of derivatization agents was developed. One highly versatile reagent for the separation of (i-blockers is A-[(2-isothiocyanato)cyclohexyl]3,5-dinitrobenzoyl-amide (DDITC) [11]. Alternatively, unichiral drugs such as (3-blockers or (S)-naproxen [12] may be used in a reciprocal approach to derivatize racemic amine compounds.  [c.189]

Luluff used depends on the nature of the system under investigation. For example, in the fir.-.l-row elements the 2p valence orbitals approach closer to the nucleus than the com-[la ruble 3p orbitals in the second-row elements (the latter are repelled by the lower 2p stales). Thus elements such as silicon or sulphur usually have softer pseudopotentials I ban their first-row equivalents carbon and oxygen. Everything else being equal, a higher aitiiff is consequently required for the latter and hence more plane waves in the expansion lie. more reciprocal lattice vectors, G). Note that in the plane wave expansion the basis fii.nctions are not associated with particular atoms but are defined over fhe whole cell Ubis also removes the problem of basis-set superposition errors as an additional benefit), rill coefficients fl, k+G are obtained by following the usual density functional scheme an initial guess is made of the electron density variation p(r), the Kohn-Sham and overlap matrices are constructed, diagonalisation gives the eigenfunctions and eigenvectors (and thus the coefficients a) from which the Kohn-Sham orbitals can be constructed and hence Ibe density for the next iteration.  [c.175]

Haslinger J., Panagiotopoulos P.D. (1984) The reciprocal variational approach to the Signorini problem with friction. Approximation results. Proc. Roy. Soc. Edinburgh 98A, 365-383.  [c.378]

Nonselective Ca.ta.lytw Reduction. Hydrocarbons, hydrogen, or carbon monoxide can be used as reducing agents for NO in applications where the exhaust oxygen concentration is low, as it is in fuel rich-burn reciprocating engines, where it is less than 1%, and in nitric acid plants, when it is from 2 to 3%. This approach is called nonselective catalytic reduction (NSCR). In some appHcations, the oxygen must be removed from the feed stream prior to the catalyst (35). An oxygen sensor in the exhaust stream signals the air—fuel deUvery system to adjust the air—fuel ratio so it is just slightly fuel-rich, having enough reducing agent present to react with all the oxygen and nitrogen oxides (1).  [c.512]

The issue of which approach to Ewald sums is most efficient for a given system size has been plagued by controversy. Probably the best comparison is that by Pollock and Glosli [46]. They implement optimized versions of Ewald summation, EMA and P3M. They conclude that for system sizes of any conceivable interest, the P3M algorithm is most efficient. Interestingly, they also show that P3M can be used to efficiently calculate energies and forces for finite boundary conditions, using a box containing the cluster and a clever filter function in reciprocal space. The particle-mesh-based algorithms are excellent at energy conservation, which is an additional advantage. On the other hand, the EMA may scale better in highly parallel implementations because of the high communication needs of the EET. In addition, since the expensive part of the EMA is due to long-range interactions, the EMA may be more appropriate for multiple time step implementations [41]. The algorithms for P3M and the force-interpolated PME are essentially identical, differing only in the form of the modification to the reciprocal space weighting factors exp[—7t-m-/p-L-]/m-. The sampling density for the P3M turns out to be a shifted B-spline, so the weighting factors are very similar. Thus for the same grid density and order of interpolation, the computational costs of the P3M and force-interpolated PME are the same. In the case that contributions to the Ewald sum from high frequency reciprocal vectors m outside the K X K X K array can be neglected, the expressions for P3M and force-interpolated PME become equivalent, and the accuracy and efficiency are thus equivalent [45]. Under all reasonable simulation parameters it was found that the errors due to neglect of high frequency reciprocal vectors were small compared to remaining errors, so the above two algorithms are equivalent for practical purposes. Eor typical simulation parameters (9 A cutoff, RMS force error lO ) the smooth PME is more efficient than either P3M or force-interpolated PME, because its accuracy is only marginally less than  [c.111]

The first approach to the accelerated development of chiral selectors reported by Pirkle s group in the late 1970s relied on the principle of reciprocity [51]. This is based on the concept that if a molecule of a chiral selector has different affinities for the enantiomers of another substance, then a single enantiomer of the latter will have different affinities for the enantiomers of the identical selector. In practice, a separation medium is prepared first by attaching a single enantiomer of the target compound to a solid support that is subsequently packed into a HPLC column. Race-mates of potential selectors are screened through this column to identify those that are best separated. The most promising candidate is then prepared in enantiopure form and attached to a support to afford a CSP for the separation of the target race-mate. This simple technique was used by several groups for the screening of various  [c.61]

The reciprocal screening of a mixed library described by Li s group very recently [92] is an interesting variation of the approach outlined in the previous text. Following a standard procedure, a L-naphthylleucine CSP 13 containing the target analyte was prepared first by attaching l-17 onto silica using a standard hydrosilylation procedure.  [c.83]

The use of multinozzle injection machines. In general, this type of machine has a horizontal reciprocating screw that feeds four injection nozzles each connected to a single cavity mold thus minimizing waste. However, one concern with this approach is the need to have the mold accurately lined up (the top and bottom surfaces of the mold will be in the vertical plane) to eliminate compound leakage at the nozzle/mold interface.  [c.462]

Pt2,V and Pt y have been investigated at 1393 K and 1224 K respectively and we have explored the [100] and [110] planes of the reciprocal lattice. The measured Intensities have been Interpreted in a Sparks and Borie approach with first order displacements parameters and using a model Including 29 a(/ ) for PfsV and 21 for PtsV. In figure 1 is displayed the intensity distribution due to SRO a q) in the [100] plane. As for PdjV, the diffuse intensity of Pt V is spread along the (100) axes with maxima at the (100) positions, whereas the ground state is built on (1 j 0) concentration wave ( >022 phase).  [c.33]

Although this description of the reciprocating-pis-ton engine fits the vast majority of gasoline engines in service, the same cycle of events can be executed in a variety of other kinematic arrangements. One such alternative approach is the rotary engine, which avoids the oscillatoi y force production of the recipro-  [c.471]


See pages that mention the term Reciprocal Approach : [c.61]    [c.78]    [c.691]    [c.692]    [c.2256]    [c.68]    [c.79]    [c.1522]    [c.469]    [c.693]   
See chapters in:

Chiral separation techniques  -> Reciprocal Approach