Averaging Energetic Values


Averaging Energetic Values  [c.320]

Averaging Energetic Values  [c.320]

P values reported for DNA electron transfer vary from 0.2 to 1.5 A Assuming that the reactions proceed by single-step tunnelling (see equation C3.2.5), explanations of the physical origin for this wide range of values include (a) the stacking interactions (Eof equation (C3.2.8 )) might be highly variable because of variations in the nature of stacking or (b) changes in the energy denominator by changes in the average energetics of the redox active donor and acceptor orbitals. An alternative explanation for small apparent p values is that the process proceeds by multistep hopping (figure C3.2.15), where many very rapid short distance steps lead to a weak apparent distance dependence. Indeed, recent experiments involving oxidation of guanine, most likely fall in the regime of either tunnelling or multistate hopping, depending upon the details of the way in which the system is constmcted.  [c.2989]

In addition to averaging and plotting energetic values associated with a trajectory, it is possible to average or plot structural quantities. The structural quantities that can be averaged are those that represent 2, 3, or 4-atom structural variables. Monitoring such a value represents a study of diffusion. A2-atom structural quantity is a distance between atoms any bonded or nonbonded interatomic distance can be monitored. A 3-atom structural quantity is an angle, and a 4-atom structural quantity is a dihedral angle.  [c.321]

The intention of the software is to compute the energetically most favored conformations of a polypeptide or protein. Because conformational energy calculations are computationally very expensive, the authors chose the unusual way (compared with other commonly used force fields like AMBER, CHARMM, GROMOS, or OPLS) of not optimizing amino acid bond lengths and angles. In fact, the bond lengths and angles are fixed to averages computed over observed values from X-ray and neutron diffraction studies on oligopeptide crystals. According to the authors, the use of rigid geometry for the amino add residues reduces the number of variables and simplifies the calculations to a great extent while still providing a reasonably accurate representation of the properties of the polypeptide chain [65].  [c.354]

Statistical mechanical averages in a molecular dynamics run are obtained by simply averaging an energetic or structural value over time steps. Thus if the values x , i are being computed in a trajectory, the statistical mechanical average is just  [c.312]

You can average and plot various energetic and structural quantities and save the instantaneous values in a file (in comma separated value, or CSV format). The period for such activity is called the Average/graph period At3. The quantities to be averaged are thus collected at times tg, tg + At3, tg + 2At, etc. The Average/graph period is specified in the Averages dialog box by n3 data steps, i.e. as a multiple of the data collection period, At3 = n3 At2.  [c.318]

Molecular dynamics is essentially a study of the evolution in time of energetic and structural molecular data. The data is often best represented as a graph of a molecular quantity as a function of time. The values to be plotted can be any quantity x that is being averaged over the trajectory, or the standard deviation, Dx. You can create as many as four simultaneous graphs at once.  [c.323]

The symplectic method LIM2 [41] was further explored in [67] with the thought that it might alleviate resonance in comparison to IM. It turns out that the parameter a affects the relationship between the numerical frequency and the actual frequency of the system. Specifically, the maximum possible phase angle change per timestep decreases as the parameter a increases. Hence, the angle change can be limited by selecting a suitable a. The choice Q > restricts the phase angle change to less than one quarter of a period and thus is expected to eliminate notable disturbances due to fourth-order resonance. The requirement that a > guarantees that the phase angle change per timestep is less than one third of a period and therefore should also avoid third-order resonance for the model problem. This was found to hold in our application to a representative nonlinear system, a blocked alanine residue [67]. Namely, the energy averages increase with At but exhibit no erratic resonance patterns for LIM2 as did IM (Fig. 9). Unfortunately, these energetic increases are not acceptable (e.g., approximately 30% and 100% of the small-timestep value, respectively, for At = 5 and 9 fs for this system). Part of this behavior is also due to an error constant for LIM2 that is greater that of leap-frog/Verlet.  [c.244]

Statistical mechanical averages in a molecular dynamics run are obtained by simply averaging an energetic or structural value over time steps. Thus if the values (xj, i are being computed in a trajectory. the statistical mechanical average is jiist  [c.312]

You can average and plot various energetic and structural quantities and save the instantaneous values in a file (in com m a separated value, or CSV format). The period for such activity is called the. Average/graph period. At . I h c quantities to be averaged are th us collected at times t(, tp +. At , tp + 2.Ai , etc. fhe. Average/grapli period is specified in the. Averages dialog box by n j data steps, i.e, as a multiple of the data collection period. At-, = n- At2.  [c.318]

You can request the computation of average values by clicking the Averages button in the Molecular Dynamics Options dialog box to display the Molecular Dynamics Averages dialog box. The energetic quantities that can be averaged appear in the left Selection column. When you select one or more of these energetic quantities (EKIN, EPOT, etc.) and click Add, the quantity moves to the Average Only column on the right. You can move quantities back to the left column by selecting them and clicking Del. Quantities residing in the Average Only column are not plotted but are written to a CSV file and averaged over the molecular dynamics trajectory. If you return to this dialog box after generating the trajectory and select one of the quantities so that the outline appears around it in the Average Only column, the average value over the last trajectory is displayed at the bottom of the column next to the word Value .  [c.320]

The use of intermolecular minimum interaction energies and distances between the model compounds and water makes the assignment of convergence criteria for the partial atomic charges straightforward. Typically, the energetic average difference (average over all interaction energy pairs) should be less than 0.1 kcal/mol and the rms difference should be less than 0.5 kcal/mol. The small value of the average difference is important because it ensures that the overall solvation of the molecule will be reasonable, while the rms criterion of 0.5 kcal/mol ensures that no individual term is too far off the target data. Emphasis should be placed on accurately reproducing the more favorable interactions, which are expected to be the more important in MD or MC simulations, at the expense of the less favorable interactions. With distances, the rms difference should be less than 0.1 A note that the l/r - repulsive wall leads to the differences generally being larger than the QM values, especially in the analysis of data from MD simulations. For both energies and differences, the criteria presented above are with respect to the target data after they have been offset and scaled (see above). In the case of small-molecule dimers (e.g., Watson-Crick basepairs), the difficulty is again in selection of the appropriate target data, as with the confonnational energetics discussed in the preceding paragraph, rather than the degree of convergence. Again, suitable experimental or QM data must be identified and then the empirical parameters must be optimized to reproduce both sets of data as closely as possible. If problems appear during application of the parameters, then the target data themselves must be reassessed and the parameters reoptimized as necessary.  [c.33]


See pages that mention the term Averaging Energetic Values : [c.321]    [c.320]    [c.323]    [c.457]    [c.540]   
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