Nitrosamines


With nitrous acid give nitrosamines.  [c.376]

Note. The nitrosamines in Class (ii) do not give the Liebermann reaction.  [c.376]

Methyl-phenyl-nitrosamine C H (CH,)NNO Liq.  [c.554]

Nitrosamines are similarly reduced to secondary amines  [c.1074]

Reduction of a nitrosamine to a secondary amine. Proceed as for a nitro compound. Determine the solubility of the residue after evaporation of the ether and also its behaviour towards benzenesulphonyl (or p-toluenesulphonyl) chloride.  [c.1076]

With nitrous acid give nitrosamines.  [c.376]

Note. The nitrosamines in Class (ii) do not give the Liebermann reaction.  [c.376]

Methyl-phenyl-nitrosamine C,H,(CH,)NNO Liq.  [c.556]

N Nitroso amines are more often called nitrosamines and because many of them are potent carcinogens they have been the object of much investigation We encounter nitrosamines m the environment on a daily basis A few of these all of which are known carcinogens are  [c.943]

Nitrosamines are formed whenever nitrosating agents come m contact with secondary amines Indeed more nitrosamines are probably synthesized within our body than enter it  [c.943]

Nitrosamine See N nitroso amine  [c.1289]

The nitrosamines are insoluble in water, and the lower members are liquid at ordinary temperatures. The separation of an oily liquid when an aqueous solution of an amine salt is treated with sodium nitrite is therefore strong evidence that the amine is secondary. Diphenylnitrosoamine is selected as a preparation because it is a crystalline substance and is thus easier to manipulate on a small scale than one of the lower liquid members. For this preparation, a fairly pure (and therefore almost colourless) sample of diphenyl-amine should be used. Technical diphenylamine, which is almost black in colour, should not be employed.  [c.204]

Reaction of Diphenylnitrosoamine. Carry out Liebermann s Nitroso Reaction as described for phenol (p. 340), but use about 0 05 g. of the nitrosamine instead of the one crystal of sodium nitrite, and finally add only 3-4 drops of sulphuric acid. The deep greenish-blue colour is obtained, becoming red on dilution and reverting to blue on being made alkaline.  [c.204]

N-Nitrosodiethylamine. Add 36-5 g. (51-5 ml.) of diethylamine slowly to the calculated quantity of carefully standardised 5A-hydra chloric acid cooled in ice (1). Introduce the solution of the hydi ochloride into a solution of 39 g. of sodium nitrite (assumed to be of 90 per cent, purity) in 45 ml. of water contained in a 250 ml. distilling flask. Distil the mixture rapidly to dryness. Separate the yellow upper layer of the nitrosamine from the distillate saturate the aqueous layer with soUd potassium carbonate and remove the nitroso compound which separates and add it to the main product. Dry over anhydrous potassium carbonate and distil. Collect the diethylnitrosamine at 172-173-5°, The yield is 41 g.  [c.426]

JVJV-Diethylhydrazine. Fit a 1-litre three-necked flask with a double surface reflux condenser, a mercury-sealed stirrer and a dropping funnel, and insert calcium chloride guard tubes into the openings of the reflux condenser and dropping funnel. The apparatus must be dry. Place 10-0 g. of finely powdered lithium aluminium hydride and 500 ml. of sodium-dried ether in the flask, stir for 10 minutes, and add a solution of 23 -5 g. of diethyl nitrosamine (Section 111,124) in 135 ml. of anhydrous ether at the rate of 2-3 drops per second. After about 20 minutes, the ether refluxes gently and a white sohd separates henceforth adjust the rate of addition to maintain the reaction under control. After the addition of the nitrosamine is complete (about 1 hour), continue the vigorous stirring for 10 minutes, and then add an excess of ethyl acetate to decompose the residual hthium aluminium hydride. Now introduce 50 ml. of ION sodium hydroxide solution, stir for 10 minutes, filter with suction, and wash the residue with two 50 ml. portions of ether. Dry the combined filtrate and washings first over potassium hydroxide pellets and then over anhydrous calcium sulphate, distil through an efficient fractionating column (e.g.. a 10 vacuum-jacketed Widmer column) and collect the oa-diethylhydrazine at 98-99 5°. The yield is 10 g.  [c.880]

The nitrosamines are insoluble in water, and the lower members are liquid at ordinary temperatures. The separation of an oily liquid when an aqueous solution of an amine salt is treated with sodium nitrite Is therefore strong evidence that the amine is secondary, Diphenylnitrosoamine is selected as a preparation because it is a crystalline substance and is thus easier to manipulate on a small scale than one of the lower liquid members. For this preparation, a fairly pure (and therefore almost colourless) sample of diphenyl-amine should be used. Technical diphenylamine, which is almost black in colour, should not be employed.  [c.204]

Reaction of Diphenybiitrosoamine. Carry out Liebcrmann .s Nitroso Reaction as described for phenol (p. 340), but use about 0 05 g. of the nitrosamine instead of the one crystal of sodium nitrite, and finally add only 3-4 drops of sulphuric acid. The deep greenish-blue colour is obtained, becoming red on dilution and reverting to blue on being made alkaline.  [c.204]

Formation of nitrosamine, RjN-NO. (a) From monomethylaniline. Dissolve I ml. of monomethylaniline in about 3 ml. of dil. HCl and add sodium nitrite solution gradually with sludting until the yellow oil separates out at the bottom of the solution. Transfer completely to a small separating -funnel, add about 20 ml. of ether and sh e. Run off the lower layer and wash the ethereal extract first with water, then with dil. NaOH solution, and finally with water to free it completely from nitrous acid. Evaporate the ether in a basin over a previously warmed water-bath, in a fume-cupboard with no flames tuar. Apply Liebermann s reaction to the residual oil (p. 340).  [c.376]


See pages that mention the term Nitrosamines : [c.28]    [c.279]    [c.554]    [c.426]    [c.426]    [c.649]    [c.556]    [c.802]    [c.41]    [c.46]    [c.74]    [c.168]    [c.275]    [c.419]    [c.626]    [c.652]    [c.676]    [c.677]    [c.682]    [c.682]    [c.682]    [c.682]    [c.683]    [c.683]    [c.683]    [c.683]    [c.683]    [c.683]    [c.683]   
Practical organic chemistry (1960) -- [ c.376 ]

Practical organic chemistry (1978) -- [ c.376 ]

Organic chemistry (0) -- [ c.943 ]