Myrtenol


Marston, C. C., 357(16), 364(16), 424 Martens, C., 357(21), 424 Martin, A, 506(10), 555 Martin, D 622(89), 655 Martin, R. L., 363(95), 426 Martin, Th 213(229), 279 Martinelli, L., 247(305), 281 Martinez, T. J. 326(16), 352 358(35-36), 361(88), 399(35-36,218-219), 400(220), 401(36,218), 402(35-36,221-222),  [c.749]

Rapid approximate predictions of pressure drop for fully developed, incompressible horizontal gas/fiquid flow may be made using the method of Lockhart and MartineUi (Chem. Eng. Prog., 45, 39 8 [1949]). First, the pressure drops that would be expected for each of the two phases as if flowing alone in single-phase flow are calculated. The LocKhart-Martinelli parameter X is defined in terms of the ratio of these pressure drops  [c.653]

The X range for Lockhart and Martinelli curves is 0.01 to 100.  [c.8]

For fog or spray type flow, Ludwig cites Baker s suggestion of multiplying Lockhart and Martinelli by two.  [c.8]

Lockhart, R. W., and Martinelli, R. C., Proposed Correlation of Data for Isothermal Two-Phase, Two-Component Plow in Pipes, Chemical Engineering Progress, 45 39 8, 1949.  [c.8]

This source of shortcut design methods, like the first one discussed, often requires a high level of ingenuity. A case in point is the Lockhart and Martinelli two-phase gas/liquid flowing pressure drop correlation. Test data can be viewed and correlated in a number of ways. These investigators found that a significant generalization would be possible if a factor was generated based upon the pressure drops of the individual phases calculated as though each were alone in the pipe. This factor could then be correlated against the multipliers necessary to generate the total system pressure drop starting with the pressure drop of either phase.  [c.401]

Lockhart and Martinelli used pipes of one inch or less in diameter in their test work, achieving an accuracy of about -l-/-50%. Predictions are on the high side for certain two-phase flow regimes and low for others. The same -l-/-50% accuracy will hold up to about four inches in diameter. Other investigators have studied pipes to ten inches in diameter and specific systems however, no better, generalized correlation has been found.The way  [c.401]

Lockhart, R. W. and Martinelli, R. C., Chem. Eng. Prog., January 1949, pp. 39-48.  [c.404]

The two-phase pressure drop is obtained by multiplying either the liquid-phase drop by (t) or the gas-phase pressure drop by. Figure 7-23 gives the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation between X and ([t s  [c.607]

Figure 7-23. Parameters for pressure drop in liquid/gas flow through horizontal pipes. (Source Lockheed and Martinelli, Chem. Engr. Prog., 45, 39, 1949.) Figure 7-23. Parameters for pressure drop in liquid/gas flow through horizontal pipes. (Source Lockheed and Martinelli, Chem. Engr. Prog., 45, 39, 1949.)
LOCKHART-MARTINELLI TWO PHASE FLOW MODULUS . 0157  [c.616]

Hortmann, A. G. Martinelli, J. E. Wang, Y.-S. 1969, J. Org. Chem. 34, 732 Hortmann, A G. Robertson, D. A 1972, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 94, 2758 Horton, D. Hutson, D. H. 1963, Adv. Carbohydr. Chem. 18, 123 Hosomi, A Sakurai. H. 1977, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 99, 1673 Hosomt, A Iguchi, H. Endo, M. Sakurai, H. 1979, Chem. Lett. 1979, 977  [c.370]

Various terminal allylic compounds are converted into l-alkenes at room temperature[362]. Regioselective hydrogenolysis with formate is used for the formation of an exo-methylene group from cyclic allylic compounds by the formal anti thermodynamic isomerization of internal double bonds to the exocyclic position[380]. Selective conversion of myrtenyl formate (579) into /9-pinene is an example. The allylic sulfone 580 and the allylic nitro compound  [c.368]

C. Petrolongo. B. Macchia, F, Macchia, and A. Martinelli, Chim. Ind.. 58, 520 (1976) Chem. Abstr.. 86, 37489.  [c.560]

N. S. Figoh, J. N. Beltramini, E. E. MartinelU, M. R. Sad, andj. M. Parera,H y)/ Catal 5(1), 19—32 (1983).  [c.226]

Lockhart and Martinelh (ibid.) correlated pressure drop data from pipes 25 mm (1 in) in diameter or less within about 50 percent. In general, the predictions are high for stratified, wavy, ana slug flows and low for annular flow The correlation can be applied to pipe diameters up to about 0.1 m (4 in) with about the same accuracy.  [c.653]

Relatively less work has been done on condensing flows. Shp effects are more important for condensing than for flashing flows. Sohmau, Schuster, and Bereusou (J. Heat Transfer, 90, 267-276 [1968]) give a model for condensing vapor in horizontal pipe. They assume the condensate flows as an annular ring. The Lockhart-Martinelh correlation is used for the frictional pressure drop. To this pressure drop is added an acceleration term based on homogeneous flow, equivalent to the G d(L/p,J term in Eq. (6-142). Pressure drop is computed by integration of the incremental pressure changes along the length of pipe.  [c.655]

Vertical In-Tube Condensation Vertical-tube condensers are generally designed so that vapor and hquid flow cocurrently downward if pressure drop is not a hmiting consideration, this configuration can result in higher heat-transfer coefficients than shell-side condensation and has particular advantages for multicomponent condensation. If gravity controls, the mean heat-transfer coefficient for condensation is given by Figs. 5-9 and 5-10. If vapor shear controls, Eq. (5-99 ) is apphcable. It is generally consei vative to calculate the coefficients by both methods and choose the higher value. The pressure drop can be calculated by using the Lockhart-Martinelli method [Chem. Png. Prog., 45, 39 (1945)] for friction loss, neglecting momentum and hydrostatic effects.  [c.1042]

This can be readily integrated numerically as long as we use the appropriate nonequilibrium equivalent specific volume in the integration. A reasonably simple form for has been suggested by Chisholm (1983), which makes use of estabhshed correlations for the slip velocity K, which depends on the Lockhart-Martinelh parameter X. Integrating Eq. (26-118) gives  [c.2352]

R. W. Armstrong, J.-M. Beau, S. H. Cheon, W. J. Christ, H. Fujioka, W.-H. Ham, L. D. Hawkins, H. Jin, S. H. Kang, YOSHITO KISHI, M. J. Martinelli, W. W. McWhorter, Jr., M. Mizuno, M. Nakata, A. E. Stutz, F. X. Talamas, M. Taniguchi, J. A. Tino, K. Ueda, J.-i. Uenishi, J. B. White, and M. Yonaga, J. Am. Chem. Soc., Ill, 7530-7533 (1989). See also Idem., ibid.. Ill, 7525-7530 (1989).  [c.9]

For our purposes, a rough estimate for general two-phase situations can be achieved with the Lockhart and Martinelli correlation. Perry s has a writeup on this correlation. To apply the method, each phase s pressure drop is calculated as though it alone was in the line. Then the following parameter is calculated  [c.7]

The Loekliart and Martinelli [32] eoiTelation is employed to estimate the two-phase pressure drop in the Kenies mixer. The pressure drop  [c.606]

Coker [33] has developed a eomputer program to apply the Loekliart-Martinelli eorrelation to determine the total pressure drop of the two-phase flow based on the vapor phase pressure drop. The program also determines the gas-liquid phase regime employing a modified Baker s map used to determine the flow regimes for horizontal gas-liquid flow. Statie mixers generate smaller gas bubbles than stirred tank reaetors (STR) and bubble eolumns, resulting in improved mass transfer rates 10 to 100 times those of a STR. Reeently, a statie mixer was sue-eessfully employed to enhanee gas-liquid mixing and mass transfer in a proeess intensifieation of a paeked-bed reaetor. This resulted in inereased produetivity, elimination of a gel byproduet in the reaetor, thus avoiding the need for frequent shutdown [34].  [c.608]

The glucosides of menthol, citronellol, nerol, geraniol, cw-myrtenol, L-borneol, linalool and a-terpineol yielded yellow-green fluorescent chromatogram zones in long-wavelength UV light (2 = 365 nm). The same applied to arbutin (hRf 45 — 50).  [c.327]

R. W. Armstrong, J.-M. Beau, S. H. Cheon, W. J. Christ, H. Fujioka, W.-H. Ham, L. D. Hawkins, H. Jin, S. H. Kang, YOSHITO KISHI, M. J. Martinelli, W. W. McWhorter, Jr., M. Mizuno, M. Nakata, A. E. Stutz, F. X. Talamas, M. Taniguchi, J. A. Tino, K. Ueda, J.-i. Uenishi, J. B. White, and M. Yonaga, J. Am. Chem. Soc., Ill, 7530-7533 (1989). [See also idem., ibid.. Ill, 7525-7530 (1989).]  [c.16]

Myrtenol, CjpHjgO, is a primary cyclic alcohol, which was isolated from essential oil of myrtle, in which it occurs principally in the form of its acetic ester, by von Soden and Elze. It is separated from geraniol, with which it is found, by fractional distillation, and by the crystallisa-  [c.148]

With phosphorus pentachloride it yields myrtenyl chloride, CioHi Cl, which by reduction with sodium and alcohol yields pinene.  [c.149]

On oxidation with chromic acid in acetic acid solution, myrtenol yields a corresponding aldehyde, which has been termed myrtenal. This body has the following characters —  [c.149]


See pages that mention the term Myrtenol : [c.177]    [c.192]    [c.266]    [c.355]    [c.226]    [c.390]    [c.317]    [c.317]    [c.317]    [c.562]    [c.1044]    [c.2353]    [c.661]    [c.153]    [c.343]    [c.280]    [c.149]    [c.149]    [c.149]    [c.208]   
The chemistry of essential oils and artificial perfumes Volume 2 (1922) -- [ c.148 ]