TRIPOD approach


The benefits claimed for the TRIPOD approach are that it provides a consistent method for auditing a situation to identify deficiencies in the factors that are likely to give rise to errors. These deficiencies can then be corrected to reduce the likelihood of accidents occurring in the future.  [c.86]

Usually, in AFM the position of the tip is fixed and the sample is raster-scanned. After manual course approach with fine-thread screws, motion of the sample is performed with a piezo translator made of piezo ceramics like e. g. lead zirconate tita-nate (PZT), which can be either a piezo tripod or a single tube scanner. Single tube scanners are more difficult to calibrate, but they can be built more rigid and are thus less sensitive towards vibrational perturbations.  [c.280]

Usually, in STM the position of the sample is fixed and the tip is raster-scanned. Like in AFM, after manual course approach with fine-thread screws, motion of the tip is performed with a piezo translator made of piezo ceramics like e. g. lead zirconate ti-tanate (PZT), which can again be either a piezo tripod or a single tube scanner.  [c.287]

Even if new methods are developed for denser integrated ckcuits with smaller features, there are other areas of computing that present formidable challenges. For example, future computers would need data storage and handling capabiHties in the hundreds of gigabits to terabit range (15,81). Existing compact disc- or magnetic drive-based storage devices cannot hold such vast amounts of information, nor can they deHver them to the ultra-high speed processors at a commensurate rate. One new approach to address these technical barriers is optical recording using holography (81). Holographic data storage uses lasers to write and read large blocks of data in a photosensitive material (eg, inorganic crystals such as lithium niobate, barium titanate, strontium barium niobate, and organic macromolecules such as bacteriorhodopsin) (81,92). By this method, storage densities of up to 1 terabit of data per cc of crystal are possible.  [c.203]

Throughout this chapter it has been argued that the effects of PIFs on human performance will be determined by the characteristics of the task (e.g., process monitoring, procedures-foUowing, diagnosis, planning, manual control). However, many process control tasks involve a combination of such features, and making it difficult to identify their precise effects. To overcome such problems. Chapter 4 presents a number of task analysis methodologies which redescribe complex control tasks into more detailed task elements whose characteristics can be more easily identified and classified in accordance with the previous dimensions. The methodology described in Chapter 4 will assist in applying the knowledge of the effects of PIFs on specific process control tasks. The use of the PIF evaluation approach in the assessment of existing systems can be achieved using the systematic procedures associated with the TRIPOD, HFAM, and HSE approaches described in Chapter 2.  [c.152]


See pages that mention the term TRIPOD approach : [c.86]    [c.87]    [c.87]    [c.174]   
Guidelines for Preventing Human Error in Process Safety (1994) -- [ c.0 , c.86 ]